Wine Travel Adventure

Bay Area & California travel blog

Tag: Napa Valley (page 1 of 2)

All things wine: Ken Frank, Etude rosé, Winesong tribute, top U.S. wine sales

Once upon a time in Napa Valley, people had to go up valley to Yountville or St. Helena for fine dining. Those days, thankfully, are long behind us.

One of the top restaurants in Napa Valley—indeed, in all the Bay Area—is La Toque, which is inside the Westin Verasa Hotel in downtown Napa, on the same street as the Oxbow Public Market. Known for its creative and oft-inspired pairings of wine and food, it is a Michelin one-star restaurant and has been for more than a decade.

Ken Frank in action. Photo courtesy of La Toque.

Late last year Jennifer Kaiser and I had an exemplary meal at La Toque and sat down beforehand for a talk with its executive chef and owner, Ken Frank, who noted that his favorite word appeared between “delicatessen” and “delight” in the dictionary.

“Delicious is my favorite word,” he said in our interview, which was published in the current issue of The Preiser Key magazine. “Food has to look good. It has to be interesting. And at the end of the day it needs to be flat-out delicious.” Continue reading

Share the fantasy adventure at Castello di Amorosa

BY KEVIN NELSON

Here we are, in a darkened dungeon deep underground, watching as our tour guide shines a flashlight on various torture devices and explains how they were used to spike, stretch, suffocate and inflict pain on sufferers in the Middle Ages. Not your typical Napa Valley winery tour, I’ll say.

Then again there is nothing typical or ho-hum about Castello di Amorosa, a spectacular $40 million Calistoga winery built in the style of a medieval Tuscan castle. Besides the dungeon it has 106 other rooms, a chapel, church, farmhouse, dry moat, drawbridge, hidden passageways, courtyards, massive stone walls and towers that rise in the center of picturesque hills and acres of grapevines.

It is not mandatory to take a tour of the castle when you go, if you go, although there are so many wonders and curiosities about the place you really don’t want to miss any of them. We are there as part of the Napa Valley Wine Train’s “Castle Winery Tour,” and our guide greets us in the chapel with an introduction you don’t hear every day.

“Hi,” he says. “I’m Mark. I’ll be your tour guide and bartender.” Continue reading

Meet you at the Grape Crusher, gateway to Napa Valley

One of the unexpected pleasures of a visit to wine country is how much art there is to see, and these pleasures include the Grape Crusher Statue, a landmark monument at Vista Point in Napa Valley.

Since its erection in the 1980s millions of cars have driven by it and hundreds of thousands of people have stopped to see it. In this sense it is like the “Welcome to Napa Valley” signs on Highway 29—a place to meet up and shoot selfies and have pictures to show the folks back home that you were there, you really were in the land of wine.

At least one couple has gotten married at the Grape Crusher. And its creator, sculptor Gino Miles, jokes that one or two babies may have been made up there too. There is a small parking lot there, a perfect spot for having lunch, enjoying the views, and apparently doing other things as well.

“I’m not from around here,” a woman visitor told this writer as she was trying to find the right angle to take a picture of the Grape Crusher. “But I saw it driving by the other night when I was going to a concert, and I had to come back and see it.”

Those who do what she did—stop and get a closer look at the Grape Crusher—are rewarded by picturesque views of the surrounding hills, Napa River and the wetlands of San Francisco Bay. It is not called Vista Point for nothing. Continue reading

Hidden treasures of Napa Valley

Today the very popular international travel site, Dave’s Travel Corner, published a wine and travel piece of mine entitled, “7 Hidden Treasures of Napa Valley.” The treasures include the Bufano statues at Robert Mondavi Winery (one of which is at left, in the barrel room), a surprising find near the deli counter at Oakville Grocery, a leafy tribute to a wine master, a unique Abraham Lincoln bust, a schoolteacher’s legacy roses near the French Laundry in Yountville, and more. Click over here to the site if you’d like to see more.

6 superstar athletes (and a coach!) who make wine

BY KEVIN NELSON

Owning a vineyard and making your own wine is a dream shared by people in all walks of life, including professional athletes and coaches.

Here are six sports superstars and one coach—a Formula One world driving champion, Heisman Trophy-winning Pro Bowl NFL cornerback, four-time NASCAR Cup champion, Hall of Fame pitcher who led the New York Mets to their first World Series title, a Rose Bowl and Super Bowl-winning coach, another race car driver and an elite PGA golfer once ranked No. 1 in the world—that have turned their dreams into a reality by establishing wineries or wine brands.

Despite their varied backgrounds, all share one thing in common: a love of wine. Known mainly for their sports achievements, they would also like to be known as the makers of excellent Cabernets, Chardonnays or Pinot Noirs.

Mario Andretti

Andretti

Mario Andretti looks every inch the consummate winemaker: hale, hearty, in robust good health. If you did not know better you would not suspect he was one of the fastest men to ever drive a racing car, the winner of the Indianapolis 500 and Formula One world racing crown, among many other titles. Long retired from racing, the 76-year-old oversees a Napa Valley winery that goes by his name. Andretti Winery’s Montona Reserve wines are named after the area in Italy where he was born and raised before immigrating to the U.S. as a teenager. Continue reading

Discover a little piece of Italy at Napa Valley Olive Oil

Olive OilTravelers are forever in search of the authentic, and if that describes you, you must seek out the Napa Valley Olive Oil Manufacturing Company in St. Helena. It’s as authentic as it gets.

It’s on Charter Avenue just as you come into town, which is where Michelin 3-star Chef Christopher Kostow is opening his new restaurant, Charter Oak, at the site of the old Tra Vigne. Turn right off the highway and go to the end of Charter and there it will be, a little piece of Italy in Napa Valley. Continue reading

Five top Napa Valley winemakers tell what inspired them to make wine

When you go to a winery tasting it is only rarely that you see the winemaker, the creative talent behind the red. pink and white liquids you have come to sample. But what stirs these men and women to make wine? What inspires them to do what they hope will inspire you?

It probably will not come as a great surprise to learn that what inspires winemakers is, well, wine. Here are five leading Napa Valley winemakers and the “epiphany” moments that started them on their calling:

Elizabeth Vianna, Chimney Rock Winery

Vianna

For her it was the taste of a 1970 Mouton Rothschild that made her think about wine in a new way. “For me that was it,” she said. “One wine, one moment. That was when I realized that wine was more than a beverage; it’s poetry, it’s art. There’s a tale behind every wine.” Chimney Rock is on the Silverado Trail in the Stags Leap District AVA. Continue reading

Chic and tasty dining at Solbar in Calistoga

BY JENNIFER KAISER

Even before you enter the lovely dining room of Solbar, the surrounding Solage Resort has begun to work its magic. Comfortable outdoor seating and contemporary fountains—some with flames rising from the water—set the casual, upscale tone.

Michelin-starred Solbar is a hotel restaurant, but looks like a chic bistro, and the superb service and food live up to expectations.

Solbar 1

We started lunch with a beet salad ($15). The beautifully prepared beets were prepared four different ways, including in chip form, and served on watercress. An unusual green goddess dressing had a strong cinnamon note.

Solbar 2

Spicy shrimp lettuce wraps ($17) are highly recommended. Tamarind-sauced rice noodles and shredded carrots nestle on avocado slices, and a traditional nam pla sauce spikes up the simply prepared shrimp. Continue reading

Adventures in California and Canada—and another on the way

By Kevin Nelson

My editors at Examiner.com reminded me the other day that I had been writing for the site for two years, and during that time I’ve met some wonderful people and gone on some extraordinary adventures. Here are a few of those adventures, all recommended:

A bagpipes player at the start of the Rockies trip.

A bagpipes player at the start of the Rockies trip.

Rocky Mountaineer train trip across the Canadian Rockies. Starting in the wonderful British Columbia city of Vancouver and ending in the spectacular mountain village of Banff, this was a two-day ride through ridiculously beautiful scenery with tasty food and wine included. Those Canadians are nice people, too. Continue reading

From Napa to New York, art, laughter and serious drinking

By Kevin Nelson

This is a California-based wine and travel blog, but sometimes I look longingly to the East and think, “Now that would be fun.” And so it is with the upcoming (January 21) “Drunk 2016: An Evening of Wine, Jewish Text Study, Art, Music, Theater and Imbibing,” to be held at the Theater at the 14th Street Y in Manhattan. Organizers of the event say it is devoted to “art, humor and some serious drinking.” If that strikes you as a good time too, see the website for the Laboratory for Jewish Culture in New York. Continue reading

Pictures of Goosecross Winery, Yountville

When I was young and living in Lake Tahoe, California I drank my share of Coors beer and now, many years later, I had the pleasure the other day of visiting, and drinking the wine of Goosecross, a  Napa Valley winery now owned and managed by Christi Coors Ficeli, the great great granddaughter of Adolph Coors. Below are some pictures of the winery from my visit there.—Kevin Nelson

Goosecross 1

The front door of Goosecross in Yountville.

Winemaker Bill Nancarrow draws Riesling from a wine 'egg.'

Winemaker Bill Nancarrow draws Riesling from a wine ‘egg.’

Continue reading

Greatest blueberry muffin in the world

By Kevin Nelson

The world’s greatest blueberry muffin can be found in the charming wine country hamlet of Yountville, California at the Bouchon Bakery on Washington Street. Of course, you will find lots of blueberry muffins there, not just one, for they are made seasonally virtually every day at this small and busy bakery next to the café of the same name.

World's greatest blueberry, right.

World’s greatest blueberry, right.

You will know you have reached Bouchon in Yountville when you see a light green building with a yellow awning and a line out the door. Virtually the only time there isn’t a line is when it’s closed.

Now some might quibble at designating anything, especially something so ordinary as a blueberry muffin, as “the world’s greatest,” and they probably have a solid point. Nevertheless there is nothing ordinary about a Bouchon blueberry muffin, which, for $3, is the opposite of grand larceny. I’ve had meals for 25 times that price that haven’t given as much pleasure.

More than once I have eaten pastries while sitting on a wooden bench in front of Bouchon, but until the other day for some inexplicable reason I had never had a blueberry muffin. After my first bite I thought, “This is really good.” After my second and third bites I thought, “This is really really good.” My grand plan was to save it for later in the day but it was gone as soon as I hit the road heading up Highway 29 to go to Francis Coppola’s winery in the northern wilds of Sonoma County.

You never experience food in a vacuum; it is always connected to the experience of that moment, how you are feeling, who you are with, whatever it is. In my case I was at the start of a day of free play and it was a lovely warm morning, blue skies and wispy clouds, and I had a full tank of gas and nowhere I had to be for hours. So how I was feeling surely magnified the pleasure of the muffin. Naw, it really was that good. Be sure to pop one in your bag the next time you get there. If you’re like me, it won’t stay in the bag long.

 

 

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