Wine Travel Adventure

Bay Area & California travel blog

Category: Paso Robles & Central Coast

A review of Vertical, the sequel to Sideways

VerticalVertical, by Rex Pickett, is a funny, sad, sexy, depressing, curious and at times bravely comic novel tailored especially for men and women who like to drink wine. The novel, published originally some years ago but updated and released in a new edition in 2016 by Loose Gravel Press, is the sequel to Sideways, Pickett’s first novel upon which the 2004 hit movie was based.

Sideways, both the novel and film, followed the comic misadventures of Miles and Jack, who drank and screwed their way around the Santa Ynez Valley in California’s Central Coast wine region. Fans of Sideways will be pleased to learn that Miles and Jack are back at it in Vertical, drinking and screwing aplenty. Although the novel’s subtitle suggests that the twosome do all their carousing on “the Oregon Wine Trail,” this is somewhat deceiving. While they do tarry, a bit, at a pinot festival in the Willamette Valley, they also pass through such places as (naturally) Santa Ynez Valley, Fresno, Clear Lake, and on the road to Wisconsin, a state better known for its cheese than its wine. Continue reading

Read, drink wine: 2 wine books you may enjoy

Being a wine and food writer and author—my two latest books, Foodie Snob and Running Snob, will be published by Lyons Press in 2017—I am always on the look for a good wine book to settle down with while enjoying a good glass of wine. Here are two recent ones I’ve read:
Sideways

  • Sideways, Rex Pickett, St. Martin’s Griffin, 2004.

Not exactly recent, is it? Oh well, I was inspired to go back and read this comic novel—confession: I never did, when it first came out a dozen years ago—upon hearing the news that Pickett, whose day job is as a Hollywood screenwriter, has released a new sequel, which came out this summer. It’s called Vertical: Passion and Pinot on the Oregon Wine Trail, and it catches us up on the lives of Miles and Jack all these years later, no doubt chronicling many more wine-soaked adventures and misadventures in the process. An earlier version of the book was released years ago; this is a newly edited and revised edition, says the publisher. Continue reading

6 things you must know about Paso Robles wine

Paso Robles is probably the hippest wine scene in California at the moment. Sunset, LA Weekly, Chicago Tribune and Wine Enthusiast have all recently blessed it with major raves. One reason for its appeal is that compared to say, Napa Valley, the gold standard of California winemaking, it’s relatively new and still being discovered. There’s an edgy, pioneering quality to Paso Robles wine and the people involved in it that adds to the hip vibe.

There’s also a cowboy and Western ranch feel to the place because, in fact, there are cowboys (the modern California version of them anyhow, gunning around in giant Chevy pickups) and Western ranches with horses grazing in pastures alongside acres of hillsides devoted to Bacchus’s favorite fruit.

One local we spoke to said that all the changes occurring in the central coast basically started about ten years ago. Google and Facebook millionaires from Silicon Valley are weekending in the area and buying up property, so you can expect more big changes to come over the next ten years. And wine—the allure and mystique and business of it—is the engine driving all these changes. Here are six things you need to know about Paso wine now:

1. Paso Robles is the next Healdsburg. Like Healdsburg and Sonoma, Paso has an historic downtown plaza. Its central area is a wide grass lawn with oak trees and other trees that provide benevolent shade on hot days. Nice spot for a picnic. Paso Robles Continue reading